‘Editing in the digital age’: full program!

The Society of Editors (WA) is please to announce the program for our upcoming winter seminar.

Editing in the digital age: software and systems for professional success

Editors should be up to date and proficient in … common word processing software for editing … and accepted techniques for handling electronic files. Australian standards for editing practice (IPEd, p. 6)

Time Presenters and session titles
8.30   am Registration
9.00 President’s welcome (Cheryl Bettridge AE)
9.05 Announcements (Kerry Coyle AE)
9.10 Dr Hilary Cadman AE ‘PerfectIt – the editor’s friend’
10.00 MORNING TEA
10.15 John Denton ‘How to build a business’
11.15 Rhonda Bracey ‘Telecommuting: Pros and cons’
12.15 pm LUNCH catered by Café Ultimo
13.00 Dr Hilary Cadman AE ‘Keeping up to date with electronic editing tools’
14.00 Margaret McNally AE ‘How many ‘p’s exist in publication?’
14.45 AFTERNOON TEA
15.00 Georgina Wilson ‘Editing for the web – same, same but different’
15.45 Thanks and close

Guest speakers

cadman2Dr Hilary Cadman

PerfectIt – the editor’s friend and Keeping up to date with electronic editing tools
Hilary is a highly experienced science and medical editor, and trainer. Her background is in science. She has a PhD in biochemistry and spent 20 years working in research laboratories and universities in the UK, France and Zimbabwe. A Master of Science (communications) led her into a career in science editing in 1999.

Denton2John Denton

Helping you not just to do business, but to build one!
John started his own training and development business in January 1997 as a licensee for Leadership Management Australia. He has 27 years experience in engineering, customer service, sales and management roles. Today, John is an experienced business person, business consultant, qualified facilitator and trainer, public speaker and ‘business ready for sale’ coach. His extensive knowledge is valuable for editors in any field.

bracey2Rhonda Bracey

Telecommuting: Pros and cons
Editing is an occupation that can be done from home—for at least part of the time. Rhonda has worked full-time from home since 2007. In this presentation, she shares her telecommuting experiences and the pros and cons of working remotely from a corporate office. Rhonda Bracey started her technical communication business in WA in 1999.

mcnallyMargaret McNally

How many ‘p’s exist in publication?
Margaret is a highly experienced editor and professional writer who has written broadly for newspapers, magazines, and corporate organisations. Until recently, Margaret was managing editor of corporate publications at Curtin University, a position she held for more than six years.

wilsonGeorgina Wilson

Editing for the web – same, same but different
Georgina is an experienced editor working with the Department of Agriculture and Food in Perth. Recently her work has concentrated on the department’s new website.

Register online now! Registration is now closed

Education and training for editors

If you missed our November meeting on Australian editing qualifications or if you want more information about the education and training we discussed, you can find all the details on the short courses and university degrees available to Western Australians right here.

Australian editing qualifications

Editors come from a variety of fields, with varying qualifications and degrees which have helped prepare them for a career spent polishing text. At the society’s November meeting, we will profile Australian degrees and courses which editors have used as jumping boards to their careers, or professional development for their skill sets.

Where: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco WA 6008 | Google map
When: Tuesday 19 November, 7.30 pm
RSVP and queries: to Amanda Ellis

Winter seminar 2013 – Editing with impact – BOOK NOW!

EDITING WITH IMPACT

SCIENCE, STANDARDS AND STYLE SHEETS

Where: Room 111/112, Building 3, Edith Cowan University, 2 Bradford St, Mount Lawley

Time: 8.30 am for 9 am start; close 4.15 pm

Cost: $125 members; $150 non-members (lunch included)

RSVP 12 July 2013

Saturday 27 July

David

Keynote speaker: Professor David Lindsay, AO, editing science

 More highlights:

• How to create a style sheet

• Clear expression

• Ethics for editors

• Cite it right

• A keen eye for graphics

Don’t miss out. View the seminar flyer. BOOK NOW.

Email: kcoyle@westnet.com.au or jknight@flyingedits.com.au to submit your registration form.

November networking meeting: defamation

Date: Tuesday 20 November 2012
Venue: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco
Time: 7.30 – 9.15
Cost: Members $5; non-members $10
RSVP: 19 November 2012 to Jan Knight

Tea, coffee, and biscuits will be provided.

Defamation in publications
At our final networking meeting for 2012, guest speaker
John Hammond, Director of Hammond Legal, will take us
into the tricky topic of defamation, something that every
editor should know about.

Everyone concerned with the writing and distribution, or
republishing, of defamatory matter may be liable – the writer,
editor, publisher, printer and, to some extent, distributor, although
it is a defence if secondary distributors such as librarians and
newsagents prove they did not know that the publication contained
defamatory matter.

Hughes, B (ed) 1993, The Penguin Working Words: An Australian Guide to Modern
English Usage, Penguin Books Australia Ltd, Ringwood, Victoria, p. 165.

~
Editing therefore requires knowledge of the following matters:
… A3.1 Current definitions of libel, defamation, obscenity,
discriminatory language, intellectual property, plagiarism, moral
rights and copyright, and their implications for a publication.
Council of Australian Societies of Editors 2001, Australian Standards for Editing
Practice, South Australia, p. 2.

~
Getting indemnity insurance for work doesn’t necessarily indicate
that something is dodgy.
SoE(WA) member, 2012

~
Pretty much every large corporation or government department I’ve
worked for in the last ten years has required my company to carry
professional indemnity insurance.
SoE(WA) member, 2012

August networking meeting — preparing for the accreditation exam

Topic: Preparing for the accreditation exam
Speakers: Accredited editors who have passed the accreditation exam

This will be an interactive session facilitated by Accredited Editors Cheryl Bettridge, Michele Drouart, Amanda Curtin, Margaret McNally, Jan Knight, Sue Thomson and Kerry Coyle. Bring your Style manual and any other resources you use with you.

The Curtin Uni publication, Treading water while the sharks are circling, designed as a guide for first year uni students sitting exams is a useful guide for anyone who has an exam looming and current Australian standards for editing practice will be distributed to all those who would like one.

The format will be something along the following lines:
Part 1: Tackling the exam 10 mins
This section covers time management, what to do first, using your strengths to their best advantage when choosing questions, etc.
Part 2: Be prepared 10 mins
This includes what to take in to the exam and how to make best use of the website.
Part 3: Survival guide 10 mins
How to remain calm and combat your nerves; hints and tips. General questions.
Part 4: Practice makes perfect (all panellists to assist group) 60 mins

Exam (apart from 10 mins to write name and number on each page and 30 mins reading time) is 3 hours. Use reading time to choose questions.

• Part 1 (25 mins)
Distribute practice papers and read intro. Read Part 1 instructions. Give 20 mins for group to answer the 24 short questions (allocation in exam is 20% so approx 36 mins). Give answers.

• Part 2 (15 mins)
Read page 6 and do some of the style sheet together as not everyone may have done one before. Examples.

• Part 3 (20 mins)
4 of the 12 need to be answered in approximately 72 mins. Let’s look at question 1.  4 of the 6 parts 1.1 to 1.6 need to be done (approx 5 mins to spend on each). Allow everyone to choose four and do them in 20 mins (cross of 5 minute intervals). They can then look at their answers and see how they went.

Hopefully these exercises reassure people that they can work within the exam’s timeframes. Remember some areas will be easier for an individual than others, so the percentage split is really just a guide. 

Wrap up and questions

Date: Tuesday 21 August 2012
Time: 7:30 pm
Venue: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco
Cost: $10 non-member; $5 members
Tea, coffee and biscuits will be provided.
RSVP barney9277@optusnet.com.au

Christmas celebration 2011

Thanks to everyone who came along to our Indian Christmas dinner at the Buddha Bar to celebrate the end of the year for the Society. We had secret santa pressies and if you weren’t happy you could swap with one you liked, Jan organised some fabulous quizzes, and we consumed a delicious banquet under the ever-watchful eye of an enormous Buddha. All to the music of Whitney Houston and Madonna!

We look forward to seeing you all next year. We won’t have a normal networking session in February but we will be having a workshop on Saturday 18 February which we’ll tell you about later. Then it’s our AGM on 6 March where we elect/re-elect the office bearers and hopefully welcome some new hands in the new year.

The committee wishes all our members a very safe, happy and productive Christmas and new year holiday!

October: Nuts and bolts of grammar and punctuation

Details
Date: Tuesday 18 October
Time: 7.30-8.30 pm
Place: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco
Cost: $5 members; $10 non-members
Tea, coffee and biscuits will be provided.
RSVP 13 October Robin Barnes

James Hansen and Anne Surma will answer questions on grammar and punctuation, adding their knowledge and skills to tricky problems posed by members. If you have ever had a difficult text to edit or want to know why a certain rule applies to a particular text, if you hate seeing apostrophes put in the wrong places, or you don’t know the best way to use a semicolon, come to this workshop. Even if you’ve been an editor or proofreader for years, we guarantee you’ll learn something new!

The presenters

James Hansen joined the society in its foundation year and is an honorary life member. He was a committee member for many years. Now retired, James has been a high school teacher (English and geography), educational media producer, equal employment opportunity officer (Education Department of Western Australia), editor, and lecturer in traditional English grammar (at the meeting, you can buy his book Take Charge! Using apostrophes and plurals correctly: an easy, friendly guide). James has also published a couple of short stories.

Dr Anne Surma lectures at Murdoch University in the English and Creative Arts program. Anne has worked in private industry as an editor and writer and, more recently, as a workshop facilitator and consultant, advising on communication strategy and practice. Anne’s research interests include public communication as ethical discourse and creative practice; corporate responsibility; and discursive approaches to dominant and marginalised narratives in public and organisational stories. She has published chapters and refereed journal articles from her work, and her monograph, Public and professional writing: ethics, imagination and rhetoric, was published by Palgrave in 2005. Currently, Anne is under contract with Palgrave to produce her second monograph, The power of professional writing: effecting social change in a global culture. An editorial board member of two international journals, Journal of Communication Management and Prism, Anne also holds the honorary title of Distinguished Editor, conferred by the national organisation, the Institute of Professional Editors (IPEd).

August: ‘Small publishers doing big things’

The publishing industry in Perth is not large but it is varied and vibrant, and it might surprise you to know how many small local publishers are finding niches in the industry and making a stellar name for themselves.

In August, our guests are two such publishers: S.J. (Steven) Finch, editor of the online magazine dotdotdash, and Tehani Wessely, publisher/editor of speculative fiction press FableCroft Publications.

Steven and Tehani will talk about their experiences in producing and promoting their works, and how editing fits into that process. There will be plenty of opportunity for questions, discussion and networking, and books will be available for sale.

S.J. Finch Steven Finch is a current PhD student at Curtin University, member of the Perth Zine Collective, as well as the editor and co-founder of dotdotdash magazine. dotdotdash is a tri-annual creative publication that launched its first issue in September 2009, and publishes creative literature and art with a focus on Australian and especially Western Australian writers. Since the publication of issue 2, the magazine has been distributed in WA and Victoria, and has attracted mention and favourable review in The Australian, The West Australian, Indigo, Sixthousand and The Canning Times. The seventh issue, ‘Sacred’, is being launched later this month.

Tehani Wessely is firmly entrenched in Australian speculative fiction and small press. As well as her role as publisher/editor of FableCroft, she has edited for Twelfth Planet Press, and judged for the Aurealis Awards, the WA Premier’s Book Awards and the CBCA Book of the Year. She also writes reviews, non-fiction and interviews for ASif! and Fiction Focus, and in 2008 was awarded the Ditmar (Australia’s best-known award in the scifi/fiction/fantasy genre) for ‘Best New Talent’. Her latest project for FableCroft is an anthology titled Apocalypse Hope (currently open to submissions).

Date and time: Tuesday 16 August 2011, 7.30–9.15 pm
Venue: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco (opposite side and one block east of King Edward Memorial Hospital)
Cost: $2 members; $5 non-members

RSVP 10 August Robin Barnes