FAQ

Is editing the same as proofreading?
Can you just do a quick edit?
Why should I use an editor?
How do editors save you money?
Won’t using an editor make all writing look the same?
Can’t I just use the spelling and grammar-check function in MS Word?
Are there different styles of editing?
What do editors charge?
Why does editing take so long?
How do I find an editor who’s right for me?

Is editing the same as proofreading?

No! Proofreading involves the correction of basic errors at the final stage of preparing the manuscript after the editing. Editors work with authors to maximise a manuscript’s potential to communicate with readers and eliminate errors that writers often miss. Editing can add strength, clarity, beauty and impact to any piece of written material.

Why should I use an editor?

You know your subject. When you write about it, your writing is obviously accurate and, in places, impressive. A good editor can help you maintain your high standards throughout the work and prepare it for publication.

Won’t using an editor make all writing look the same?

Editors will not try to impose their style on your writing, but will simply strengthen your unique style.

Are there different styles of editing?

Yes. Editors can come from academic, scientific, business or creative fields, and they will bring their experience and personality to the project to a certain extent. However, all professional editors will meet the standards for editing your project. We recommend discussing your project with a few editors before you make your final choice so that the relationship with you, your editor and your project has the best chance of success.

Why can editing take some time?

Editing takes time because editors are not fire fighters, poised at the top of the fireman’s pole, ready to leap to work when the alarm goes off. They have other work on their desks. Also, the detailed look required of a proper edit takes time, and often it takes several readings of a document to spot all the errors and inconsistencies.

Can you just do a quick edit?

There is no such thing as a quick or a light edit. An editor will do whatever it takes to bring a text up to standard, just as a car mechanic will do everything necessary to keep your car safe on the road. Would you demand only a light service when in fact the brakes need replacing to keep you from crashing?

How do editors save you money?

Whatever you spend on an editor will be more than offset by what you save. Unedited texts cost real money in mistakes, reprints, lost readership and credibility.

Can’t I just use the spelling and grammar-check function in MS Word?

No. Even if this function were foolproof (which it is not), editing involves so much more than correcting spelling and grammar.

What do editors charge?

See Quoting and rates.

How do I find an editor who’s right for me?

Use our online register of freelance editors to search our membership for a suitable editor.

Visit the Society for Editors and Proofreaders’s website for other helpful answers to FAQs.

NEWS

  • Mentoring – could you be a mentor?

    20 October 2019

    Some newcomers to IPEd may not be aware that we run a mentoring program. This is not a course in basic or beginner editing. Rather it is one of the ways you can gain new skills or learn more about … Read more

  • All about the Standing Committee on Academic Editing

    While wandering the forest of IPEd acronyms and abbreviations, members may have wondered what the SCAE is and what it does. Our Editors WA branch president sits on the IPEd Standing Committee for Academic Editing, responsible for the important task … Read more

  • President’s Report 2019

    17 August 2019

    Click on the link to read the EditorsWA President’s Report from the Annual Branch Meeting on 30 July 2019: President’s report, ABM 2019 30 July 19

  • Making Connections: Kate Cuthbert workshop for editors and writers

    28 March 2019

    Networking opportunity with writers We are about to host one of our most focused outreach events ever on 13 April. Rather than contemplating our own navels and talking to ourselves we are stepping outside our immediate community to talk with … Read more