Exam resources

If you’re taking the IPEd accreditation exam in May, you might want some help with exam stress and general relaxation/anxiety control.

Curtin University has some fantastic resources. A few of the publications cost a little but many of the resources are free. Have a look around these links to publications and MP3/4 recordings:

http://life.curtin.edu.au/health_wellbeing/Publications.htm

https://life.curtin.edu.au/health_wellbeing/Downloads.htm

https://life.curtin.edu.au/health_wellbeing/CounsellingSelfHelp.htm

2014 IPEd accreditation exam date announced

The fifth IPEd accreditation exam will be held on Saturday 3 May 2014. Like the previous four exams, this will be a pen and paper exam.

Passing the IPEd accreditation exam demonstrates an editor’s professional competence and understanding of editing standards, skills and knowledge.

Registrations for the exam open on Monday 6 January and close on Monday 7 April. The cut-off date for early bird registrations and payments is Friday 7 March. Ensure you are a financial member of the society to take advantage of the lower exam fees for society members. All registrations must be made on the registration form (see note below) and accompanied by the relevant fee. All fees, however paid, must be received by IPEd by close of business on 7 April.

The exam fees are:

Financial members of a society of editors:
Sitting first time: $570; early bird $540
Re-sitting: $285; early bird $270

Non-members of a society of editors:
Sitting first time: $725; early bird $690
Re-sitting: $362; early bird $345

GST is not applicable. Members of a society who are not financial at the time of registration will be charged the non-member fee. Exam fees may be tax deductible.

The fee has been calculated as the minimum required to cover exam costs in 2014. It is based on a target number of applicants and, if this target is not reached, the Accreditation Board may postpone the exam until 2015. There will be no limit placed on the number of candidates who may sit the exam; all candidates who register and pay the fee by the closing date will be accommodated.

Two sample exams are available from the IPEd website. Both sample exams are very good indicators of what you can expect in May, and trialling them will help you decide whether you are ready for the real thing. It is recommended that you not attempt the exam unless you have at least three years’ full-time professional editing experience. All societies of editors will be organising pre-exam activities to help prepare candidates.

To obtain further information, contact your Accreditation Board delegate or consult the guidelines for candidates on the IPEd website.

Please note: The form must be filled in online. It will not be complete and registered until you click the Submit button at the bottom of the form and see a web page with the message ‘Your response has been recorded’.

Education and training for editors

If you missed our November meeting on Australian editing qualifications or if you want more information about the education and training we discussed, you can find all the details on the short courses and university degrees available to Western Australians right here.

Australian editing qualifications

Editors come from a variety of fields, with varying qualifications and degrees which have helped prepare them for a career spent polishing text. At the society’s November meeting, we will profile Australian degrees and courses which editors have used as jumping boards to their careers, or professional development for their skill sets.

Where: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco WA 6008 | Google map
When: Tuesday 19 November, 7.30 pm
RSVP and queries: to Amanda Ellis

Winter seminar 2013 – Editing with impact – BOOK NOW!

EDITING WITH IMPACT

SCIENCE, STANDARDS AND STYLE SHEETS

Where: Room 111/112, Building 3, Edith Cowan University, 2 Bradford St, Mount Lawley

Time: 8.30 am for 9 am start; close 4.15 pm

Cost: $125 members; $150 non-members (lunch included)

RSVP 12 July 2013

Saturday 27 July

David

Keynote speaker: Professor David Lindsay, AO, editing science

 More highlights:

• How to create a style sheet

• Clear expression

• Ethics for editors

• Cite it right

• A keen eye for graphics

Don’t miss out. View the seminar flyer. BOOK NOW.

Email: kcoyle@westnet.com.au or jknight@flyingedits.com.au to submit your registration form.

Networking meeting 18 June: Taking the axe out of tax

When? Tuesday 18 June 2013, commencing 7.30pm for a 7.45pm start, finishing at 9.15pm

Where? Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco

Are you daunted or confused by the many regulations around your tax rights and obligations? Do you get a headache just thinking about it? Would you like to pay less taxlegallyif you could? Are you new to freelancing and still finding your way around tax? Or would you simply like some assurance that you’re getting it right?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above then you need to come along to our June members meeting where John Nicholls, owner of J Nicholls & Co Chartered Accountants, will be presenting on tax matters and preparation for small businesses. John regularly presents on taxation matters to Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance (MEAA) members and comes personally recommended by several of our society members.

Not able to attend the meeting but would love to know more? Email your questions to peta.robson@westnet.com.au by Wednesday 12 June for inclusion in the presentation and reporting back to the membership. The answer to your question might be very helpful for someone else!

Planning to attend the meeting? Please RSVP to peta.robson@westnet.com.au by Sunday 16 June.

November networking meeting: defamation

Date: Tuesday 20 November 2012
Venue: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco
Time: 7.30 – 9.15
Cost: Members $5; non-members $10
RSVP: 19 November 2012 to Jan Knight

Tea, coffee, and biscuits will be provided.

Defamation in publications
At our final networking meeting for 2012, guest speaker
John Hammond, Director of Hammond Legal, will take us
into the tricky topic of defamation, something that every
editor should know about.

Everyone concerned with the writing and distribution, or
republishing, of defamatory matter may be liable – the writer,
editor, publisher, printer and, to some extent, distributor, although
it is a defence if secondary distributors such as librarians and
newsagents prove they did not know that the publication contained
defamatory matter.

Hughes, B (ed) 1993, The Penguin Working Words: An Australian Guide to Modern
English Usage, Penguin Books Australia Ltd, Ringwood, Victoria, p. 165.

~
Editing therefore requires knowledge of the following matters:
… A3.1 Current definitions of libel, defamation, obscenity,
discriminatory language, intellectual property, plagiarism, moral
rights and copyright, and their implications for a publication.
Council of Australian Societies of Editors 2001, Australian Standards for Editing
Practice, South Australia, p. 2.

~
Getting indemnity insurance for work doesn’t necessarily indicate
that something is dodgy.
SoE(WA) member, 2012

~
Pretty much every large corporation or government department I’ve
worked for in the last ten years has required my company to carry
professional indemnity insurance.
SoE(WA) member, 2012

Confirmation of accreditation exam

The IPEd Council has confirmed that the 2012 accreditation exam will go ahead on Saturday 13 October. Candidates are advised to read carefully the Guide for candidates and the Q&A section on the IPEd website and to make sure they ‘sit’ at least one of the sample exams available on the website under exam conditions and then mark their work against the marking guide well before 13 October, so they will know which aspects they need to focus on in their exam preparation. They should also read the Style manual for authors, editors and printers (6th edn) and at least one or two of the other references listed in the guidelines.

Any queries should be directed to the WA Accreditation Board delegate, Jo Smith at jo.smith@wordsmithwa.com.au

September networking meeting: A month in the life of an editor

Topic: A month in the life of a working editor

Speakers: A panel including Deb Fitzpatrick, Satima Flavell and Bruce Robins

Each member of the panel will take a turn to talk about their recent work, especially its challenges and the solutions they found. Questions from members and guests will be encouraged after each speaker and there will be a general question-and-answer session at the end. Bring your own questions and challenges along to see if they can be resolved on the night.

Deb Fitzpatrick began her editing life as a newspaper proofreader, publishing house slush-pile reader, and, later, UWA’s publications coordinator. Her interest in fiction editing grew with her own interest in writing, and Deb did a master’s degree in creative writing at UWA in the 90s, where she met Georgia Richter. Seven years ago Deb and Georgia teamed up to launch ProofEd Editing Services, a freelance editing business they ran together over their kitchen tables and in between kids’ naps before Georgia was snaffled by Fremantle Press to be their publisher of adult fiction and poetry. Deb now focuses on fiction copyediting and proofreading, and writing for children and young adults. Her two books, 90 packets of instant noodles and Have you seen Ally Queen? were both listed by the Children’s Book Council of Australia as Notable Books in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Her third book will be published by Fremantle Press in October 2013.

Satima Flavell is a freelance writer, editor and reviewer. From a background in the performing arts, she began writing on the arts in 1987, and her reviews and feature articles have appeared in The Australian, The West Australian, Music Maker, Dance Australia and many other journals. She is currently Reviews Editor for The Specusphere, a webzine for the speculative fiction community, and she also writes for the arts website Artshub.

Although her background lies in non-fiction she has had several poems and short stories published and she is seeking a home for her fantasy trilogy, The Talismans. As an editor, she specialises in speculative fiction, memoir, genealogy and academic papers.

Bruce Robins has 25 years experience as an editor, including around 20 years as a public servant, responsible for writing and editing many government documents.

His career as a freelance editor at RobinsonTate has been one of peaks and troughs. A few jobs were completed at low rates but they triggered a rush of word-of-mouth popularity, notably in the government sector, where Bruce’s value-added services (providing insights over and above pure editing) seemed to strike a chord. His clients have also included mining companies and self-publishing authors.

Bruce plans to sit the IPEd accreditation exam this year.

Date: Tuesday 18 September 2012

Time: 7:30 pm

Venue: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco

Cost: $10 non-member; $5 members

Tea, coffee and biscuits will be provided.

RSVP tanya@writeonwriting.com.au

August networking meeting — preparing for the accreditation exam

Topic: Preparing for the accreditation exam
Speakers: Accredited editors who have passed the accreditation exam

This will be an interactive session facilitated by Accredited Editors Cheryl Bettridge, Michele Drouart, Amanda Curtin, Margaret McNally, Jan Knight, Sue Thomson and Kerry Coyle. Bring your Style manual and any other resources you use with you.

The Curtin Uni publication, Treading water while the sharks are circling, designed as a guide for first year uni students sitting exams is a useful guide for anyone who has an exam looming and current Australian standards for editing practice will be distributed to all those who would like one.

The format will be something along the following lines:
Part 1: Tackling the exam 10 mins
This section covers time management, what to do first, using your strengths to their best advantage when choosing questions, etc.
Part 2: Be prepared 10 mins
This includes what to take in to the exam and how to make best use of the website.
Part 3: Survival guide 10 mins
How to remain calm and combat your nerves; hints and tips. General questions.
Part 4: Practice makes perfect (all panellists to assist group) 60 mins

Exam (apart from 10 mins to write name and number on each page and 30 mins reading time) is 3 hours. Use reading time to choose questions.

• Part 1 (25 mins)
Distribute practice papers and read intro. Read Part 1 instructions. Give 20 mins for group to answer the 24 short questions (allocation in exam is 20% so approx 36 mins). Give answers.

• Part 2 (15 mins)
Read page 6 and do some of the style sheet together as not everyone may have done one before. Examples.

• Part 3 (20 mins)
4 of the 12 need to be answered in approximately 72 mins. Let’s look at question 1.  4 of the 6 parts 1.1 to 1.6 need to be done (approx 5 mins to spend on each). Allow everyone to choose four and do them in 20 mins (cross of 5 minute intervals). They can then look at their answers and see how they went.

Hopefully these exercises reassure people that they can work within the exam’s timeframes. Remember some areas will be easier for an individual than others, so the percentage split is really just a guide. 

Wrap up and questions

Date: Tuesday 21 August 2012
Time: 7:30 pm
Venue: Tom Dadour Community Centre, 363 Bagot Road, Subiaco
Cost: $10 non-member; $5 members
Tea, coffee and biscuits will be provided.
RSVP barney9277@optusnet.com.au